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Wood type

Discussion in 'Growing Areas' started by InkMinx, May 9, 2017.

  1. InkMinx

    InkMinx New Member

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    Next question! So wood for making the orchidarium environment. Im going to use cork pieces but was also planing on branches. I was going to use Grape vine pieces as they looked nice and interesting, but I just read elsewhere that in the humidity of a dark frog tank they tend to have mould problems. So what wood types would people suggest, I have also found Liana, savannah and tronchos wood, would either of those be suitable. The grapevine branches can be regular or sandblasted, should I stay away from both?
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2017
  2. carl

    carl Active Member

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    I have found rhododendron to be fairly long-lasting, with a fairly rough, but not flaky, bark.
     
  3. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I've used grape vine in the past. They do tend to have things sprouting on them in my greenhouse. I never treated mine, so that could be a problem. If you use it, look for larger, gnarled branches. The best are the ones where they have been pruned back year after year. The smaller ones rot really quickly. I just looked at a Dendrobium that has been on one of those for over 10 years and is still good.

    If you can find it, leptosperum is great. It has papery bark, but it stays put for years.
     
  4. Chuck-NH

    Chuck-NH Well-Known Member

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    image.jpeg image.jpeg image.jpeg
    On the east coast I find it easy to get Mountain Laurel (Kalmia latifolia). I find it useful both for the thin branches as well as larger trunks which can be sliced into slabs. It seems to last forever, even for things constantly wet. The first picture is a Dendrobium aurantiflameum seedling, the second shows the roots of a Comparettia falcata which has been on the mount for 5+ years. The last picture is of both Lepanthes inca and Pleurothallis niveoglobula, which are watered daily. I also have a Barkeria scandens that is mounted on a larger trunk that must be close to 20 years old. OK, that one needs to be redone .
     
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  5. Ricardo

    Ricardo Slave of demanding bird

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    I use teakwood. There are huge trees all around my house and in the surrounding forest and fallen branches are common. Sometimes trees fall on the road and there are plenty of left over branches. It is dense, heavy and impressively resistant to rot, even when regularly drenched in fertilizer. I have a Bulbophyllum lasiochilum that was planted on one branch back in 2005 and it has covered it completely. Even though it is very resistant to rot, the lower part, which stays wet longer is slowly melting away. IMG_7051.JPG
     
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  6. Ricardo

    Ricardo Slave of demanding bird

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    A friend got some branches, I don't know where, and mounted many of his plants on them. It turned out that the branches were of a tree that produces a chemical that inhibits the growth of other plants. A first he didn't know what was happening and was quite distressed that nothing he did helped his plants. I forgot which tree it was that had the growth inhibiting compound.
     
  7. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Since you are in the UK maybe you could check with your local Orchid Society or hopefully someone on the forum from the UK will respond. You may not have access to some of the species mentioned.
     
  8. InkMinx

    InkMinx New Member

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    Thanks all. I have opted for pretty much all cork branches in the end as I figured they would be easier to attach the orchids to. Just not sure on how Im going to prep them for the tank yet as I have ordered some huge pieces!
     
  9. carl

    carl Active Member

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    Are the cork pieces in tubular form? You could make an armature out of pvc pipe to hold them.
     
  10. InkMinx

    InkMinx New Member

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    Ive ordered some flat and some tubes of varying thicknesses and length so I can make structures