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Restrepia trichoglossa

Discussion in 'Orchid Species' started by Boytjie, Aug 4, 2015.

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  1. Boytjie

    Boytjie Out hiking Supporting Member

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    As other folks on here have said, there's really no reason not to have at least one or two Restrepia species. They don't take up much room, they're fairly undemanding, and they're almost always in bloom. This one has been growing in my cool tank under LED lights, fairly bright, with high humidity and constant air movement. Flowers are about an inch long. A dozen spikes at present, with more buds coming. Please excuse the cell phone pic.
    - Stephen

    FullSizeRender (19).jpg
     
    Ted Baenziger and wpinnix like this.
  2. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Nicely grown. For all the reasons you stated, I love these little guys, too. I have several species that are just as forgiving but for some reason my R. elegans is a stubborn bloomer.

    I just divided (and removed keikis) my massive R. trichoglossa plant and now have a zillion pieces of this. I guess I have a Restrepia trichoglossa farm :rolleyes:
     
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  3. Boytjie

    Boytjie Out hiking Supporting Member

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    My reluctant bloomer is R. cuprea. Grows right alongside my other three species, all of which bloom nonstop, and this thing just sits there.
     
  4. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Interesting. My cuprea and purpurea are as free flowering as the trichoglossa. There must be subtle temperature or light preferences.
     
  5. Ted Baenziger

    Ted Baenziger Member

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    Since these species come from all over Central and South America, but always in high humidity, the problem with growth probably has to do with altitude (not attitude), and therefore temperature gradients. I have quite warm conditions and some are happy, others (of the 18 species in my wardian case) do not do well. I've tried putting them on the balcony, in morning light, when temperatures dip to 50 degrees F., but that is rare in Houston, and often the daytime temps go above 80. Conundrum. Maybe I should try a modified wine cooler...