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Restrepia cuprea

Discussion in 'Orchid Species' started by pcolman, Jan 8, 2018.

  1. pcolman

    pcolman Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Probably one of the least handsome plants in my collection. Not that there's anything wrong with the species, but my conditions are less than ideal. I get dead leaf tips and warped leaves. I'm sure it would be happier in a cool greenhouse. But at the same time, I've grown it for over a decade and it blooms often throughout the year, particularly in winter. The bright orange flowers are a little over 2" tall.

    I'm growing it intermediate, medium light, doesn't dry out much.

    Restrepia cuprea.jpg
    Restrepia cuprea flower.jpg
    Restrepia cuprea closeup.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2018
    Natureman, Fereydoon, weeand and 7 others like this.
  2. PaphLover61

    PaphLover61 Active Member Supporting Member

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    Nevertheless, the flowers are quite fetching!
     
  3. Chuck-NH

    Chuck-NH Well-Known Member

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    That's a nice blooming! I sometimes find that cuprea recurves a bit at the tips and yours is pretty flat. I usually find the warping of the leaves to be a moisture stress reaction. Intermediate temperatures should be fine.
     
  4. glen_On_Gulf_Coast

    glen_On_Gulf_Coast Glen_On_Gulf_Coast

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    Wow. That's nice!
     
  5. pcolman

    pcolman Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Not certain what you mean. It's definitely not from a lack of moisture. I think insufficient humidity is more likely, though the R. langsbergii and R. cymbula next to it don't suffer from it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2018
  6. Chuck-NH

    Chuck-NH Well-Known Member

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    Hi, your earlier comment stated " doesn't dry out much" which I inferred meaning that is does dry out sometimes? I have quite a few Restrepia and find that a few species (to include cuprea) are prone to this warping and find that it always seems to be a function of lack of moisture or root loss (same issue). For me, Sometimes a small division will get lost and as the sphagnum ages and dries, it doesn't easily rehydrate. Would think that low humidity could also have similar effects, but would think your humidity much be fine now given the condition of your blooms?
     
  7. pcolman

    pcolman Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    I doubt its ever actually dries out. There's a good pad of moss around the roots and it gets watered every day. I prefer to think that it does it to spite me.
     
  8. Kipper

    Kipper CoffeeCoffeeCoffee... Supporting Member

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    Fabulous. :clap:
     
  9. Chuck-NH

    Chuck-NH Well-Known Member

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    There is that too . But now that you triggered my OCD, I'm going to go looking for warped leaves this evening.
     
  10. Chuck-NH

    Chuck-NH Well-Known Member

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    Hi,

    Just looked at my cuprea. It is very moist, heavily shaded and there is no warping or purple pigment to the leaves. The problem is only a few blooms for the size of the plant. Did note warping on some plants of trichoglossa, vasquezii, limbata and sanguinea. These were older leaves and I believe prior to last repotting
     
  11. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I grow my cuprea warm and shady. My plant is far from pristine but I am not getting the tip die-off or the purple tint to the leaves. I suspect the leaves dying back is more light related. I like the leaf color and see that as desirable but but perhaps not at the expense of deformed leaves and die back.

    Nice blooming!
     
  12. Dave The Scientist

    Dave The Scientist Active Member

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    What's your water quality like? I found my Restrepias (mostly from Kelly) seemed significantly happier when I switched to distilled.
     
  13. pcolman

    pcolman Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    NYC tapwater. 40-50 TDS. I use very dilute fertilizer most waterings, total TDS with fert is about 150 TDS in winter, close to 250 in summer. As I mentioned, only my cuprea does this. The other two species I have don't. I talked to a few growers about this at the NJOS show yesterday, and most of them seem to have experience similar things with Restrepias, where one plant just does this while others don't.
     
  14. piotrm

    piotrm Well-Known Member

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    amazing plant
     
  15. Chuck-NH

    Chuck-NH Well-Known Member

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    Hi pcolman,

    Here is a picture of my cuprea, which is grown quite shady...I'm going to move it into a little more light and see if I get any pigmentation. Also note that I posted a picture of my trichoglossa in your lansbergii thread and it had a lot of pigment on exposed leaves.

    image.jpeg