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Phalaenopsis wilsonii

Discussion in 'Orchid Species' started by naoki, May 22, 2015.

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  1. naoki

    naoki Well-Known Member

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    Fairbanks, Alaska
    I'm very interested in Chinese deciduous Phalaenopsis (subgenus Aphyllae) and Parishianae, but it's been a bit tough to figure out how to grow them. Here is a previous ST thread where I asked for some help. I've had this P. wilsonii for about 3 years (and it was already mature plant). First winter, I kept it too warm, above 65F (and maybe too much water). Second winter, I went to the opposite; kept it at 7C (45F) for 2 months with watering once every 5-7 days, and short day light (9-10hours). I had a high hope, but it didn't. This winter, I didn't pay much attention; I kept it at 18C (65F) max 10-13C (50-53F) min and watered every day with 12hour light. Finally a success! I know that it is not a super difficult species, but I'm still pretty excited about this. But P. malipoensis in the previous thread hasn't flowered yet, it makes flower shoot(s) every year, but it is at a weird time of the year, and the flower buds don't appear.

    [​IMG]
    Phalaenopsis wilsonii
    on Flickr

    Notice the short, nipple-like spur, bottom side of the lip, opposite from the side-lobes of the lip, just below "hinge" of the lip. It is a bit difficult to see in the next photo because the spur in the shadow. It is right side of the yellowish area of the lip.

    Taxonomy of subgenus Aphyllae is pretty confusing (more details below). This short spur is supposed to be one of the distinguishing character of this species from P. taenialis (=P. braceana) according to the Stig Dalstrom's articles:
    Dalstrom, S. Phalaenopsis taenialis. Orchids. August 2010: p. 468-471
    Dalstrom, S. and P. Ormerod, Green Phalaenopsis Orchids. December 2010: p. 706-709

    [​IMG]
    Phalaenopsis wilsonii side view
    on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    Phalaenopsis wilsonii lip from the bottom
    on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    Phalaenopsis wilsonii lip
    on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    Phalaenopsis wilsonii plant
    on Flickr

    Flower color changes to greenish/broze color after the flowers were pollinated.
    [​IMG]
    Phalaenopsis wilsonii after pollination
    on Flickr


    According to Dalstrom, the treatment of this group by Christenson's book is not quite right. So there should be 5 species in subgenus Aphyllae. Here is my understanding from Dalstrom's articles.

    --- pinkish flower
    * P. taenialis (=P. braceana)
    - pink, but stress can cause orange-yellowish flower
    - long spur, size similar to lateral lobe
    - warty root.
    - P. braceana originally from Bhutan- But Cribb found it in SW Yunnan

    * P. wilsonii (=P. chunxiongensis, nipple larger?)
    - pink, rose, mauve flower
    - short nipple like spur
    - verrucose (warty) root

    -- green/brown flower
    * P. honghensis
    - copper brown flower (but green or deep pink possible?)
    - well defined spur
    - Based on Liu's cultivated plants from Yunnan

    * P. strobartiana (=P. hainanensis)
    - olive green to bronze flower
    - short nipple like spur
    - flat roots, mildly verrucose

    -- flowers are distinct from the rest
    * P. natmataungensis
    - dark brownish stripes and marking on the sepals and petals, not confusing.
    - From N. Myanmar, in 2003, described in 2010.
     
  2. Alexey

    Alexey Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Congratulations and thanks for posting!

    Three years ago I got seedling of P. wilsonii. Now it looks mature enough and perhaps is ready to be transferred in the cooler spot at the winter time. So far it has never experienced real deciduous conditions and always had one or two green leaves in winter. What about your plant. Was it leafless this winter or that leaf on the photo is from the last summer? Did you increased light level in winter?
     
  3. xmpraedicta

    xmpraedicta Prairie angraecoid nut Supporting Member

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    Very nice - I'll have to make some notes from your cultural success. Mine is just growing leaves.
     
  4. naoki

    naoki Well-Known Member

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    Alexey, mine always have at least one leaves. I think that it kept the leaves even when I was trying really hard rest (2 years ago). At that time, I wasn't watering a lot, but I did try to keep the humidity high. The current single leaf is from the last summer. A good point about the light (I didn't think about it). Indeed the light level did increase a little bit (maybe 20% more) because I installed an extra LED strip (XF-3535L which I posted here) around last christmas.

    Calvin, hopefully yours will flower next year. I still don't know what caused it to flower, though.

    The seed pods are huge with this species.