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New to Neofinetia

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by BecaMac, May 2, 2021 at 7:53 PM.

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  1. BecaMac

    BecaMac New Member

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    Got my first Neo a week ago (Neofinetia Falcata x self), my second 2 days later a Benisume and I have a Hisui and Kibana on the way...I am baffled about light for these guys. I have them in a south facing window but as I live in the woods the light (especially in the “leaf” season) is quite dim. I have read that Neos require 1200 to 1500 Fc, today, although it was overcast, I measured my light and found it to be around 8000 Fc! Even away from the window the lowest light I can achieve is around 4000 Fc. Is this a hopeless problem for getting them to bloom?...
     
  2. Roberta

    Roberta Active Member

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    Welcome!
    How are you measuring the light? I have trouble believing those numbers...full noontime summer sunlight in southern California is about 10,000 fc. (SPF 30 required at a minimum!) So with 60% shadecloth, my outdoor plants are getting something like 4000 or much less where there are trees and other sources of shade. And that's at noon. Others on the Forum will be able to give you some guidance as to how to measure the effective light that your plants will be getting in your environment.
     
  3. J E

    J E Jaime Escobedo

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    They like more light in winter when the deciduous trees lose their leaves. A little less than Cattleya/vanda light in winter, in the growing season bright but shaded light in right half way between vanda and phalaenopsis works if you can imagine that range.
     
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  4. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I would try for "indistinct shadow" during the bright part of the day. By that I mean that if I hold my hand about 18" above the plant with the fingers spread out, I would see a shadow outline of my hand, but very difuse with no distinct edges.

    Like Roberta, I find the numbers you have a bit unlikely. If they aren't getting hit with direct sunlight at mid day you should be fine.
     
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  5. Gabriel Urbina

    Gabriel Urbina Member

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    More light in winter, less light in summer. Watch the heat in summer too, you can lose them to dehydration/leaf burns if you're not careful. I pretty much follow the same light culture as J E suggested and mine are happy. I find they can take direct sunlight for a few hours a day during summer, i've noticed that the leaves of the pink/magenta flower varieties develop reddish pigmentation when you're reaching light levels that are too strong for too long.
     
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  6. BecaMac

    BecaMac New Member

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    I actually don’t believe it either...but I have a light meter and no reason to believe it’s not calibrated properly. It does say that it’s for measuring incandescent light though so maybe that’s the problem...thanks for your thoughts
     
  7. BecaMac

    BecaMac New Member

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    That’s a really good suggestion...we’re due for rain for the next 2 days but next time the sun comes out I’ll give it a try.
     
  8. Roberta

    Roberta Active Member

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    Did you by any chance point the meter at the light source? That would give an erroneous high reading. You'd want to measure it on a surface (such as a white sheet of paper) But Marni's approach will give you a more useful, and functional, idea of what the plant is actually experiencing.
     
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  9. BecaMac

    BecaMac New Member

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    Thanks Marni and Roberta for the idea of the “shadow” test. It’s taken days to see the sun but now that I have it looks like I have the opposite problem. I can see occasional shadows as the window is shaded by a large oak tree about 25 feet away. Will intermittent light be sufficient to get the plants to bloom.
     
  10. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Can you see any shadow from your hand over the plant? Blooming may depend on the cultivar and especially on a cooler, drier period in the winter months.
     
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  11. BecaMac

    BecaMac New Member

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    I did see some shadows today as it was exceptionally bright so it could be I was too quick to judge yesterday. My understanding was that blooming for neofinetia is not temperature dependent..it is difficult for me to get a nighttime drop in temperature...that’s what attracted me to them. I’ve had really good luck with Ludisia (Haemaria) discolor
     
  12. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Before I start being concerned very much about the conditions for blooming, I would wait and see if they bloom. It may be that just letting them dry more in winter would be enough to initiate blooming.