Welcome to OrchidsForum.com. We are a friendly online community for Orchid Growers all over the world. If you haven't joined yet we invite you to register and join our community. Hope to see you on our forums!

Mystacidium capense

Discussion in 'Orchid Culture' started by Boytjie, Sep 9, 2011.

Tags:
  1. Boytjie

    Boytjie Out hiking Supporting Member

    Messages:
    864
    Likes Received:
    250
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Question for all you Ang-types: I've got one of these with great root growth, not so much in the way of foliage; just kinda hangs out for the past year. Looking at photos on here, I see several M. capense with yellowish leaves, which I'm assuming comes from bright growing conditions. All cultural references I've found online suggest shade. Could mine be improved with higher light levels...? Thanks! -Stephen

    Oops, and I spelled the title wrong. Dyslexia setting in. (Or I need to lay off the coffee.)
     
  2. Uluwehi

    Uluwehi angraecoids, dendrobiums and more Supporting Member

    Messages:
    1,973
    Likes Received:
    120
    I haven't quite cracked the code myself. Hopefully T. migratoris will give some detailed advice on light and winter watering :)
     
  3. T. migratoris

    T. migratoris Active Member

    Messages:
    588
    Likes Received:
    64
    Location:
    Mother Lode area, California
    I grow mine in relatively bright conditions in a polycarbonate greenhouse with 50% aluminet shade cloth. They get no shade or anything remotely close to shade. High humidity - 80% is typical & higher in the evening. Temperatures vary this time of year between 65F or so at night & 88F max day. During the winter the heater comes on at 55F & on some dreary days it never really gets much warmer than that. Spring & Fall I'll see the entire temp range - 55F night & 88F day. I water daily in the morning as long as there are growing root tips & pull back when they cover with velamen - during the winter they'll see water perhaps once a week or twice if it's clear & warm. I fertilize once a week this time of year when I have the time & energy. They're mounted on cork although they don't really seem to need much of a substrate - the roots go everywhere.

    Hope that helps!
     
  4. Uluwehi

    Uluwehi angraecoids, dendrobiums and more Supporting Member

    Messages:
    1,973
    Likes Received:
    120
    Superb cultural data! Many thanks, T. Migratoris :clap:
     
  5. Boytjie

    Boytjie Out hiking Supporting Member

    Messages:
    864
    Likes Received:
    250
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Thanks! I'll try increasing the light for starters and see how that does. -Stephen
     
  6. mrbreeze

    mrbreeze Anglican Supporting Member

    Messages:
    1,362
    Likes Received:
    35
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    In Joyce Stewart's presentation on Angraecoids, she mentioned that this plant grew rampantly in the upper canopy of deciduous trees.
     
  7. T. migratoris

    T. migratoris Active Member

    Messages:
    588
    Likes Received:
    64
    Location:
    Mother Lode area, California
    Yeah. My leaves look lousy ... I'd never win a cultural award with these plants ... but they certainly throw the spikes.