Welcome to OrchidsForum.com. We are a friendly online community for Orchid Growers all over the world. If you haven't joined yet we invite you to register and join our community. Hope to see you on our forums!

My Grow Area

Discussion in 'Growing Areas' started by rico, Dec 16, 2017.

  1. rico

    rico Active Member

    Messages:
    273
    Likes Received:
    80
    Location:
    Minnesota
    I've been meaning to do this for a while, but just recently got around to actually doing it- lazy me! My grow area is basically just a couple of racks in front of some large south facing windows. I've had the large rack covered in plastic for about 5 years but only got additional lighting for it recently. The terrariums have been here for about two years and have been slowly filling up since I got them. The lighting for the terrariums has been with them since the beginning- there wasn't enough natural light for those plants without it. Additionally, I have another lamp for a bench with some NOID Phalaenopsis I was gifted recently from someone who wanted them gone.

    The two terrariums each have more sensitive plants in them. One has my small Nepenthes collection (N. jamban, lingulata, inermis, and dubia) and the other has a fussy Bulbophyllum and some seedlings. The two lower levels of the rack the terrariums are on are occupied by a few Christmas cacti and other succulent things. Between the terrariums and the main grow rack is a large NOID Nepenthes I bought about ten years ago. It's absolutely massive and luckily tough-as-nails as it survives well in our cold and dry house. The main grow rack is spit into three sections and is completely covered in clear vinyl plastic. The plastic covers all of the outside and is taped together. The lowest level of the rack has a large storage bin that the plastic angles into to direct excess water out of the way. It is pretty well sealed and keeps the humidity up between mistings for a few days at a time. The middle level of the rack has lower light plants and ones that are generally shorter and have a more pronounced winter dormancy. The top level is much taller than the others (it has hanging and mounted plants) and is split in half by more plastic. The left half is for plants that like water year-round and it gets watered or misted four or five times a week. The right half has plants that like less water in the winter; it gets misted or watered only once or twice a week and generally has a lower humidity level.

    I grow a variety of species and hybrids but I enjoy the species more: they are more of a challenge and therefore much more fulfilling. I won't go over every plant I grow but if you wonder about a certain one in the pictures you can comment questions. Thanks for looking!


    Grow Area Full Area w-o Terrariums.JPG


    Grow Area Full Area w Terrariums.JPG


    Grow Area Phalaenopsis.JPG

    Grow Area Terrarium Area.JPG

    Grow Area Nepenthes Terrarium.JPG

    Grow Area Orchid Terrarium.JPG

    Grow Area Lower Rack.JPG

    Grow Area Full Upper Rack w Plastic.JPG
     
    weeand, KellyW and Kipper like this.
  2. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    6,488
    Likes Received:
    2,264
    Location:
    Redding, California, USA
    Looking good Carter.
     
  3. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    13,115
    Likes Received:
    2,880
    Location:
    Santa Rosa, CA
    Great set up. Thanks for taking the time to post.
     
  4. naoki

    naoki Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,459
    Likes Received:
    1,164
    Location:
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    Looks great. Are you keeping these highland Nepenthes pretty warm (since you have Phalaenopsis etc)?
     
  5. rico

    rico Active Member

    Messages:
    273
    Likes Received:
    80
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Naoki, yes it is rather warm from a highlander perspective. The room all my plants are in dips to around 60 degrees F. at night and the heater goes to 65-70 during the day. The Phalaenopsis are tolerant of it even though there is really low humidity. The Nepenthes are a bit of an odd case though: their terrariums are almost always 60% + humidity and they do go down to 60 degrees at night, but they are so small they heat up really fast in the sun. When the sun comes out the terrariums get up to 95-100 degrees for most of the day. I've never noticed any negative affects, but I do observe them very carefully just to be safe. Those high temps are part of the reason I don't want to try more cold-highland Nepenthes; my current plants have adapted well but I'm afraid edwardsiana, villosa, or rajah would not fare as well.
     
  6. naoki

    naoki Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,459
    Likes Received:
    1,164
    Location:
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    I'm surprised that these Neps can handle 95-100F (I have only N. dubia and N. jamban)! Did you try open-top? It might reduce the heat-up. If the area isn't too tubulent, open-top chamber can keep a decent RH.
     
  7. rico

    rico Active Member

    Messages:
    273
    Likes Received:
    80
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Naoki, I have tried to keep the front "door" cracked open for some time and there is a computer fan in the top that can suck hot air out, but our house is so dry that both options drastically dried it out when I tried them.
     
  8. naoki

    naoki Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,459
    Likes Received:
    1,164
    Location:
    Fairbanks, Alaska
    I see, Iguess that with a fan, the RH inside would quickly become same as the ambient. I usually don't use any fans for the open-top configuration (I just use large rubbermaid type containers).