Welcome to OrchidsForum.com. We are a friendly online community for Orchid Growers all over the world. If you haven't joined yet we invite you to register and join our community. Hope to see you on our forums!

Microcoelia stolzii

Discussion in 'Orchid Species' started by DPfarr, Apr 14, 2012.

Tags:
  1. DPfarr

    DPfarr Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,471
    Likes Received:
    476
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    aimg607.imageshack.us_img607_964_img20120413155829.jpg
    aimg593.imageshack.us_img593_1091_img20120413155853.jpg
    aimg33.imageshack.us_img33_98_img20120413155912.jpg

    Wanting to make a sib cross of it, but oh man those are some small parts!
     
    Kipper likes this.
  2. gg68

    gg68 Angraecoid addict

    Messages:
    1,750
    Likes Received:
    1,237
    Location:
    France, Alsace
    Very generous little one!!:clap:
     
  3. gnathaniel

    gnathaniel Lurker Supporting Member

    Messages:
    784
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    Athens GA, USA
    Very cool plant! Re: making the sib cross, do you know any medical professionals with steady hands? Provide one with a toothpick, a good loupe, and a quick course in orchid anatomy; 5 minutes and a $10k bill later you'll have a pod forming! :p
     
  4. xmpraedicta

    xmpraedicta Prairie angraecoid nut Supporting Member

    Messages:
    1,704
    Likes Received:
    505
    Location:
    Saskatoon, SK
    That is stunning!
     
  5. theLab

    theLab Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    116
    Likes Received:
    5
    Sometimes a pollen of the same plant isn´t accepted already at the stage of the pollination (note the difference between pollination and fertilization). Although you place the pollen correctly at the scar it isn´t pulled to the ovaries later and so no pod will develop. This is the first process of the plant preventing a self-pollination. There are some others taking place later which maybe result in seeds carrying no embryos and appearing as not-viable.
    But sometimes a trick may be helpful.

    Take two pollinia – one from the plant you are intending to pollinate and another about the same size but from a genus a pollination won´t certainly work, like in this case … Microcoelia and Dendrobium. Lay both pollinia on the scar side by side. In any case don´t remove the pollen of the flower you want to pollinate, not even lift the anther-cap. The next what it takes are 3 times an Ave Maria and a few days of patience. Spraying the plant with holy-water (if available) is important, too, then it takes 2 Ave Maria only.
    The plant now focuses the repulsion (hoping that´s the right term in English) against the unfamiliar pollen and it can happen that it therefore shows no reaction towards its own pollen, accepts it and pulls it back to the ovaries.

    This Microcoelia is very nice, indeed, never has been offered here since Isobyl ha closed her nursery. May I be so cheeky asking for some dry-seeds in the case it worked well?
     
  6. Uluwehi

    Uluwehi angraecoids, dendrobiums and more Supporting Member

    Messages:
    1,973
    Likes Received:
    120
    Nice, chunky plant. Mine is in spike right now. It is my understanding (and I hope I'm wrong) that there is only one clone of Microcoelia stolzii in cultivation, at least in the US, 'Cathy Fenwick's Medusa'. Do you know the provenance of your clone?
     
  7. DPfarr

    DPfarr Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,471
    Likes Received:
    476
    Location:
    Sacramento, CA
    We got two in the closing of Hoosiers, and they may well be the same clone. I haven't made any comparisons, other than this one is much faster growing than the other. At any rate, it would be nice to have a new population of them. I forgot to get out my pollinating hands today, but will have this as first priority when I return.