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Microcoelia exilis

Discussion in 'Orchid Species' started by Uluwehi, Apr 14, 2012.

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  1. Uluwehi

    Uluwehi angraecoids, dendrobiums and more Supporting Member

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    This tiny leafless angraecoid orchid bloomed last summer with a number of flowers. It is a sequential bloomer and its blooming carried on for nearly two months. I have found it to be a vigorous grower in my warm vivarium with bright light at 2000fc. It gets watered daily year-round. Humidity is high, always 85% or higher and air movement is moderate, temperatures are 62-86°F/16.5-30°C. I would even call it "easy" to grow :)

    This miniature species has a broad native range including DR Congo, Somalia, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Malawi, Mozambique, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Madagascar and the Kwa-Zulu Natal Province of South Africa.

    My plant came from Botanica Ltd. It was propagated from stock originally imported from Isobyl la Croix.

    The flowers are quite small and that macro is the best I can do with my non-SLR camera. The ruler is in cm.

    afarm8.staticflickr.com_7162_6833417341_3c5f4748bf_z.jpg

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    afarm8.staticflickr.com_7016_6833655051_b63442c26b_z.jpg

    afarm8.staticflickr.com_7170_6833402771_870c04566c_z.jpg
     
    J E likes this.
  2. mrbreeze

    mrbreeze Anglican Supporting Member

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    Totally great! I've never tried a leafless (besides one or two dead former ghost orchids), but if i ever get the proverbial gh I think I must. Well done.
     
  3. Uluwehi

    Uluwehi angraecoids, dendrobiums and more Supporting Member

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    Thanks, Mike! It was not an easy subject to photograph. You should go for this one; I bet it doesn't need a greenhouse (or even a proverbial one :poke:, hehe). It's pretty hardy, as far as leafless species go.
     
  4. T. migratoris

    T. migratoris Active Member

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    Wedding gift, perhaps?
     
  5. MiKa

    MiKa Active Member Supporting Member

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    Graceful, subtle and classy is some of the words I think describes its beauty. Well grown also.
     
  6. CJWatson

    CJWatson Member

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    Jacob, have the roots grabbed onto the cork, or are they mostly dangling out in the air?
     
  7. Uluwehi

    Uluwehi angraecoids, dendrobiums and more Supporting Member

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    I don't often hear praise for this species; I very much enjoyed your response. Next time I talk to my plant I'll pass on your compliments.

    A year ago, I didn't think the roots would adhere much, but in the past 6 months its root mass has doubled (!!) and reached around to the back of the mount, as if there were a magnetic field forcing them to do so.

    Of all the leafless angraecoids I grow, this is perhaps the most exuberant. It's main competition for speed and vigour is Solenangis aphylla (which I am soooo excited that I am finally going to bloom for the first time after 3 years of growing it!!).
     
  8. gg68

    gg68 Angraecoid addict

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    The spikes are very long...I've never seen so long spikes for this species!!:eek:
     
  9. Uluwehi

    Uluwehi angraecoids, dendrobiums and more Supporting Member

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    Hi Gilles, they are really long! I just took at look at J. Stewart's entry for this species. She said M. exilis can have inflorescences up to 25cm in length, quite long.
     
  10. EGOISTA

    EGOISTA Member

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    Good job,in the firts for the coltivation and then for the pictures, the flowers are very small, it's hard make a good macro!
    Thank you for sharing, I tried a time with her but I wasn't lucky...I have a Microcoelia koheleri alive but It doesn't do flowers :(
     
  11. CJWatson

    CJWatson Member

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    Thank you for the information, Jacob. I've had my plant two years and although it came tied to a knot of wood, it doesn't seem to be adhering or doing any spectacular growing -- although I can see some very slow but steady progress. Now your have given me hope it may suddenly wake up and earn its space in the GH.

    I have not done well with Ang leafless in general, but most probably because the Microcoelias gilpinae and macrantha came so beat up and half dead to begin with. And I do regret not buying the Solenangis aphylla when it was available.
     
  12. YEAHYEAH

    YEAHYEAH Member

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    Looks great Jacob...you might want to do something about your fertilizer, to help with leaf growth. ;)
     
  13. Uluwehi

    Uluwehi angraecoids, dendrobiums and more Supporting Member

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    Thank you. If I understand correctly, you grow your orchids outdoors? The leafless angraecoids really relish consistently high humidity; perhaps there would be a way to locally increase average humidity in a section of your growing area? Also, leafless like moderately bright light, equivalent to levels appropriate for Cattleya.

    LOL.