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In situ Kenya

Discussion in 'Orchid Species' started by W. Malewa, Apr 30, 2022.

  1. W. Malewa

    W. Malewa Active Member

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    Location:
    Kenya
    This time of the year a good number of species are flowering in Kenya and I recently came across:
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    Polystachya adansoniae
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    Angraecopsis amaniensis. This specie can be differentiated by the sharp spur from A. breviloba which is similar in appearance when not in flower, but has a shorter and blunt spur. In the location where I came across them, there were many, and although not famous as a lithophyte, there were a few, one shown here:
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    When the habitat is right for a species, they can be all over the place.
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    Another amaniensis, this time of the genus Rangaeris, with most likely a Red-chested Sunbird.
     
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  2. rico

    rico Active Member

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    Location:
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    I see so many seedpods on the Rangaeris! Do you think this species self-pollinates or is it just that frequently pollinated?
     
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  3. spiro K.

    spiro K. Well-Known Member

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    Fantastic, almost never seen species! Thank you!
     
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  4. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Location:
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    Thanks for the wonderful in situ images!
     
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  5. W. Malewa

    W. Malewa Active Member

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    Location:
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    The following research makes interesting reading about Rangaeris amaniensis pollination, amongst others: Fig. 5. (a) Rangaeris amaniensis , (b) Aerangis thomsonii , and (c) A..... In short, it doesn't auto self pollinate, though seems for a limited extent self compatible. I guess the more flowers on one plant / clump, the higher the pollination rate also because of the scent trail. Rangearis amaniensis doesn't grow fast, this plant is at least 20 yrs old, maybe the moths even know by now where it is and when it flowers?
     
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