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Habenaria roeblenii

Discussion in 'Orchid Species' started by Marni, Dec 18, 2013.

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  1. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    This is considered by some as a variety of H rhodocheila but I accept that it is different. I have grown this for a couple of years now and it gets better and stronger every year. The flowers are surprisingly long lasting and certainly bright enough to cheer up the greenhouse on a grey day. It is currently in flower which seems rather late in the year, but since I am fairly new at growing these, I just accept that they have their own cycles.

    hab.roebl.close.8865.jpg
    hab.roebl.spikes.8865.jpg
    hab.roebl.plant.8865.jpg
     
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  2. xmpraedicta

    xmpraedicta Prairie angraecoid nut Supporting Member

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    You do so well with these. Bravo. How easily do these make new bulbs?
     
  3. Jeff9

    Jeff9 Member

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    Beautiful
     
  4. gg68

    gg68 Angraecoid addict

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    Really beautiful!!!
     
  5. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Stunning, both blooms and photos. :clap:
     
  6. Ricardo

    Ricardo Slave of demanding bird

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    I wonder if their taxonomy has anything to do with the orientation of the horny appendanges close to the column, perhaps it would be prying too much into their proclivities.
     
  7. ZWUM

    ZWUM Bulbophiliac Staff Member

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    Beautiful Marni!
     
  8. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Those are the stigma.
     
  9. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Calvin, I don't know that I can answer that. This one was one growth a few years ago and now has several. Many just don't come up again (or at least not after last year) others just still have one growth and some have an increase of 1 robust growth and one small one. I've been told that they are fickle. The ones that didn't come up at all this past year still have what I put in the pot in the spring. I don't know if they will come up next year or if they are gone.
     
  10. Dave

    Dave Active Member Supporting Member

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    Fab!
     
  11. Fumiaki Takahashi

    Fumiaki Takahashi miniature orchidaholic

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    I know this is an old thread, but I realy like it and wanted to let you know.
    I loooove the red.
     
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  12. Piranhacon

    Piranhacon Member

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    I know this is a post from 2013, but I don't know if anybody has addressed this question in future posts.

    Ricardo's question is spot on as to the separation of the species within what is known as the Habenaria rhodocheila complex, in this case. It is the orientation of the horny appendages, (as Marni states - are the stigmas).

    There is an article on the internet that discusses the differences between the different species within what is known as the Habenaria rhodocheila complex. These species are: Habenaria erichmichaelii, Habenaria janellehayneinia, Habenaria rhodocheila, Habenaria roebelenii, and Habenaria xanthocheila.

    It is also possible to tell the difference between some of the species by the shape of the labellum. For instance, the labellum of Habenaria erichmichaelii is far narrower than the other species of the Habenaria rhodocheila complex.

    They are all lithophytes that grow in very similar habitats, (limestone outcrops and cliffs). They are either growing attached on top of the rocks or in between the rock crevices.

    https://www.rhs.org.uk/about-the-rhs/pdfs/publications/the-orchid-review/2011/December/habenaria.pdf
     
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