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Greenhouse pets

Discussion in 'Pets and Wildlife' started by TheKellylove, Jul 31, 2017.

  1. TheKellylove

    TheKellylove Active Member

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    As my greenhouse nears completion, I'd like to do some research on a pet or a lizard that could do well in a high humidity environment.

    I spoke to my local lizard guy and he recommended house geckos. I looked them up, and they seem to be nocturnal, small, and overall not that interesting. I had dreams of a surly iguana with a designated branch that he hangs out on.

    Does anybody have a greenhouse pet that roams free? Any recommendations?
     
  2. Ray

    Ray Orchid Iconoclast Supporting Member

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    Take a longer-term view before you decide.

    At some point, you're going to need to use pesticides in the greenhouse. What do you do then?
     
  3. DPfarr

    DPfarr Well-Known Member

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    I had a surly iguana that loved Oncidinae. Talk to some local herpetologist and get some local frogs maybe? If they get out not a big deal.

    I'd like the same, preferably a tortoise to meander as it pleases eating weeds that sprout on the ground. Having to spray inhibits said dream though.
     
  4. Ricardo

    Ricardo Slave of demanding bird

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    In my shadehouse I have three different species of Anole lizards, one species of nocturnal gecko, four species species of frogs and one snake. They don't touch the most troublesome pests which are hard scales and white flies. They are quite used to my presence and some of the younger ones will jump on me if they see an engorged mosquito on my skin. Iguanas are herbivorous and can be pretty ill tempered, in particular large territorial males.
     
  5. Ray

    Ray Orchid Iconoclast Supporting Member

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    I've always thought that having some free-flying birds in a greenhouse would be pretty neat (notwithstanding the pesticide issue), but finding ones that can tolerate the conditions and not eat your plants and flowers can be an issue.
     
  6. carl

    carl Active Member

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    I know the late Bill Wilson (he of Penn Valley Orchids fame) kept toads in his greenhouse - he'd grumble about them digging themselves into the pots, and dislodging the plants, and commenting on the racket they'd make in the spring. However, they would eat slugs and things like sowbugs. He went so far as to leave buckets of stuff for them to dig into for their winter beauty sleep.

    I also remember Lee Soule giving a talk back in the '80s, and noting that when he had a small snake temporarily lodging in pot bottoms, he never had slug problems, but they didn't eat snails.
     
  7. TheKellylove

    TheKellylove Active Member

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    Yes, I had considered the pesticide issue. That is why I wanted something rather large and noticeable (like an iguana) rather than something small and hidden like those house geckos. That way it could be removed if necessary.

    A tortoise sounds interesting. Several of my local guild members have large Madagascar tortoises of some kind. Too large.
    Maybe a box tortoise?
     
  8. goods

    goods Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Geckos of the genus Phelsuma would be cool additions to a greenhouse, and they would likely help with your insect problem. A large portion of their natural diet is fruit, so they would also appreciate "smoothies" from time to time or the pre-packaged "day gecko diets".

    You would want some of the forest tortoises if you went that route since they are used to higher moisture levels. They would also need some time outside or a strong source of UVB since the greenhouse material will block all useful levels of it. Some tortoises to research are Elongated, Red/Yellow foot, and species in the genus Kinixys (though I would only recommend captive bred Kinixys). There are also some turtles that might work as well (but they will still need UVB). American box turtles (Terrapene), species in the genus Cuora, Heosemys spinosa (again CB only) would all be decent candidates as long as some kind of shallow but large water area is provided.

    I would go with Phelsuma if I had a fairly escape-proof greenhouse. Species like laticauda are large enough to be showy and can be obtained fairly cheaply (they were introduced to the Hawaiian islands, so they are imported from there in high numbers). A decent sized colony could be obtained without breaking the bank, so you can see them more often and may even produce offspring.
     
  9. DPfarr

    DPfarr Well-Known Member

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    Hummingbirds routinely pollinated Ascocentrums at Gold Country Orchids. They come in through the roof vents and do their thing with garayi, miniatum, curvifolium types.