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Gongora pollination

Discussion in 'Everything Else Orchid' started by KellyW, Jul 9, 2011.

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  1. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I was going to self my G. histrionica (powellii) this morning. I sacrificed one of the flowers by picking it to inspect before trying to pollinate some of the others. Hmmm ... I couldn't find the stigmatic surface. After going on the internet and reading I found that they are difficult to pollinate because there is a tiny slit for the pollinia to fit through. Well, I couldn't find that either. After reading further it turns out that some smaller plants may be male only. Have any of you had experience or success with Gongora and wish to share your ideas on the subject?
     
  2. Dale

    Dale New Member

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    Kelly, I've successfully pollinated several species. To be sure, they're difficult. However if you remove the pollinia a day before you effect the pollination it's easier. The pollinia dry out a little and are easier to insert. The slits to the anther become more obvious and a little wider.

    Same goes for stanhopea, coryanthes, and sievekingia.
     
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  3. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Thanks, Dale. I'll give it a try.
     
  4. Dale

    Dale New Member

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    Welcome, Kelly. Good luck. BTW, this information was relayed to me by Troy from Gernot Bergold. I used to have the email, but lost it. Dr. Bergold was quite anthropomorphic in his descriptions, so it's just as well.
     
  5. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    My thoughts were probably paralleling his descriptions. We are, after all, only human.
    I just came in from harvesting the pollinia. I placed the pollinia on a piece of "Scotch" tape so I wouldn't lose it so I hope the adhesive does not damage it in some way. I'll try to do the pollination tomorrow.
     
  6. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Dale, one more question. Is the slit longitudinal and on the upper surface of the column?
     
  7. Dale

    Dale New Member

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    They're on the ventral surface of the column. There are two of 'em, as I recall, and they're perpendicular to the axis of the column.
     
  8. Paul J

    Paul J New Member

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    Dale is quite correct in his morphology. I might add that to find the stigmatic slits, look for a thin and narrow flap or ridge behind where the pollinia were attached. The slits are behind that flap. The sizing of the slits prevents cross-pollination between species, so things work a bit better if the pollinia of the donor are smaller than those of the recipient species. Like many species, size matters, but not necessarily in the manner many people think. In this case, an oversized pickup truck is useless.
     
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  9. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Thank you, Paul. I tried it today. Time will tell if I was successful. I have several other spikes developing so I will have plenty to practice on soon.
     
  10. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Apparently I had one successful pollination. I'll try more on the spikes that are currently developing.
    Gongora pod.jpg
     
  11. This_guy_Bri

    This_guy_Bri weirdo

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    congrats!
     
  12. Paul J

    Paul J New Member

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    Hoorah! Now for the long wait, but be careful. I have had Gongora capsules fatten and mature in only a few months and split while still green, others may take more than 6 mos and then yellow and split in a short time. Not sure what the general pattern is for G. histrionica.
     
  13. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Thanks, Paul. I'll keep a close eye on it.
     
  14. dahiker

    dahiker Member

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    Anything happen with your Gongora, KellyW?
     
  15. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Yes. The pod ripened and I sent it off to Troy at Meyers Conservatory for flasking. It has not germinated yet so I still have my fingers crossed. FYI, the pod split and was harvested on day 67 after pollination. That seems very quick for ripening so I hope it was viable.