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Epidendrum conopseum

Discussion in 'Orchid Species' started by KellyW, Jan 24, 2013.

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  1. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Also known as Epi. magnoliae. The tag on mine says it is the Mexican form.
    This is mounted on manzanita, intermediate conditions but high in the gh so it is on the warm side of intermediate, bright light.
    Epidendrum conopseum single-1000.jpg Epidendrum conopseum group2-1000.jpg Epidendrum conopseum plant-1000.jpg
     
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  2. goods

    goods Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Nice one Kelly! This species holds special significance with me because it is native to Louisiana. I've actually been able to see it in the wild and rescued a piece from a branch that went down in one of the hurricanes. The Mexican form is significantly larger and more robust in all aspects compared to our native variety. The variety found here also can tolerate some fairly cold temperatures. I think it can survive here without issue into the 20s and maybe even the teens. Last I read, these were being used in an attempt to create extremely cold tolerant Epi/Enc hybrids.
     
  3. piotrm

    piotrm Well-Known Member

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    very cute and well flowering epi
     
  4. emuehlbauer

    emuehlbauer New Member

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    As I recall, the breeding with conopseum to make colder tolerant hybrids happened way back, in the 80's I believe. Anything practical come of it?
     
  5. goods

    goods Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    I have no idea when the conopseum breeding took place. I just remember reading about it a while ago. I think the only cross I've seen for sale with it is conopseum x tampensis.
     
  6. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Bartley Schwartz did some crosses with it in the early/mid 80's. He was a grower in the San Francisco Bay Area. He used the clonal name 'Highland.' I got a seedling from him at one point but it never bloomed for me and eventually I moved it out.
     
  7. CoveLady

    CoveLady Active Member

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    It's a very sweet little plant, if high up in the greenhouse it must be hard to find with a lot of plants. I like it.
     
  8. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Thanks, Anita. I like it too. It is just starting to spike now.
     
  9. Ray

    Ray Orchid Iconoclast Supporting Member

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    I have a warm feeling about that species, as well.

    When I had "the big freeze" that wiped out a 20-year collection, a friend's father gave me one that had been collected in Panama, as my first plant to start rebuilding.
     
  10. JPM

    JPM New Member

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    This species, long known as Epidendrum conopseum, was reported to be correctly named Epidendrum magnoliae-- the name published in 1813, by Gotthilf Heinrich Ernst Muhlenberg, a mere month before the more widely known publication of Epidendrum conopseum by Robert Brown; and a wholesale change from conopseum to magnoliae was begun. But on closer inspection, it has now been found that this was in error, since Muhlenberg's name was not validly published, as it lacked a citation of where the specimen described was collected. So the correct name is Epi. conopseum after all!

    It is being used in hybridization more and more often, frequently with the specific intention of creating cold-resistant hybrids (some strains of the species being able to tolerate temperatures down to the low-teens Fahrenheit or, reportedly, occasionally even lower). I recently (in July 2019) obtained a seedling of a hybrid between Epi. conoposeum and Epi. melanoporphyreum. On its fourth (and apparently, first mature) growth it was already in bloom, the spike finally producing 7 blooms, and a new growth forming. This new growth matured in only a couple of months and itself initiated a spike-- which lengthened and lengthened until it had produced almost thirty flowers, blooming sequentially for months. It is in fact still in bloom, with the last 7 flowers still open. In the meantime another new growth has sprouted and matured, and buds on the spike on this new growth are almost ready to open... and it will have at least 12 blooms, perhaps many more. I have been surprised at the vigor and floriferousness of this hybrid; other pleasant traits are the excellent flower form-- the petals are not strongly reflexed as are those of most Epi. melanoporphyreum and many conopseum -- the color (which is dark green with rich mahogany overlay) -- and the scent, discernible both by day and night, reminiscent of lilacs and hyacinths. So far, I have not heard that this hyrbid has been registered and named; if one hears of it I would be grateful to know the hybrid epithet, as the names of both parent species are rather long!
     
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