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Dockrillia in cultivation (N. America)

Discussion in 'Everything Else Orchid' started by KellyW, Nov 17, 2015.

  1. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I have become enamored of this genus and am curious which species are currently available in the U.S. Below is a list of what I have and I would like to hear from anyone that knows of sources for any other species. Thanks.

    Oh, BTW, I know D. lichenastrum is available but I just don't have one yet. Many on the market labelled as D. lichenastrum are actually D. prenticei.

    Here is what I have
    Dockrillia calamiforme (I think. Labelled as D. teretifolia but isn't)
    D. casuarinae (also came mislabelled as wassellii. I.D. is not verified)
    D. cucumarina
    D. linguiforme
    D. prenticei (used to be D. lichenastrum var. prenticei but I believe is now a separate species)
    D. pugioniformis
    D. rigida
    D. striolata
    D. teretifolia (still small seedlings)
    D. toressae
    D. wassellii
     
    annabanana1987 likes this.
  2. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Kelly, I can give you Den schoeninum (edited: not D schoenina as I originally wrote).
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2015
  3. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Oh, great. That is very nice. Perhaps I have something you can use.
     
  4. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Pollen works!
     
  5. DPfarr

    DPfarr Well-Known Member

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    I have a bowmanii that came from H&R.

    I'd really love to get fuliginosa or sp. ex Snake River described in the Lavarack book.
     
  6. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the bowmanii tip. It isn't on their current price list so I may give them a call.

    I would like to get a fuliginosa, too but moreso a hepatica. I had to look up the sp. ex Snake River (never heard of it) but yes, very cool.
     
  7. gnathaniel

    gnathaniel Lurker Supporting Member

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    I've been looking for fuliginosa for years. Supposedly Tom Nasser has/had it for sale a while back but for some reason I could never get him to confirm that, much less sell me one. I think Ed Merkle also grew it at one point though I've never asked him about it. Hopefully someone in the US still has this species since importing from Australia or New Guinea doesn't seem too easy or affordable these days.

    Another two sort-of species for the list are (linguiforme var.) nugentii and x grimesii, a natural hybrid of nugentii and calamiformis. Not 100% on the latter because what's going around as that may instead be the difficult-to-distinguish artificial hybrid Virginia Jupp (linguiforme x teretifolium).
     
  8. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Thanks Nathaniel. Sounds like you enjoy this genus as well.
    I have ignored nugentii since it may just be a synonym of linguiforme. I don't know if that debate is on-going.
    Do you have many of this genus?
     
  9. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    At one point I had and may still have nugentii. I'll have to look for it. Has anyone mentioned Den fairfaxii?
     
  10. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    No one has mentioned fairfaxii. That is another one that I haven't seen offered commercially.
     
  11. gnathaniel

    gnathaniel Lurker Supporting Member

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    Kew's WCSP currently lists Dendrobium nugentii as a distinct species in its own right, though I find it confusing to tell from linguiforme. I think nugentii has rougher-feeling leaves and somewhat blunter flower tepals? Might have those mixed up... Some of what gets called linguiforme definitely seems intergrade between the two, though, I suppose due to wild or captive crossing.

    I do enjoy this group a lot and Australian Dendrobes in general are some of my favorite orchids. Right now I grow teretifolium (small seedlings from Marni's flasking though obtained secondhand), linguiforme, maybe nugentii, striolatum, wassellii, 'not-wassellii' (cf. either casuarinae or racemosum), x grimesii (possibly Virginia Jupp), lichenastrum, and toressae. I used to grow rigidum, the prenticei form of lichenastrum, and another clone of striolatum but traded or gave them away in the last few years.
     
  12. DPfarr

    DPfarr Well-Known Member

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    Have you guys ever seen the Australian efforts in making Dockarilla hybrids? There are some cool things I've seen on eBay some lonely bored late nights.
     
  13. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Hmmm, I've seen a lot of the kingianum and speciosum hybrids. I'm not sure I have seen the Dockrillia hybrids. I'll have to go look.
     
  14. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I did find my Den. nugentii plant today. I bought it as linguiforme. Shortly after I bought it it was in bloom when Ron Parsons came to visit. He didn't even have to pick it before saying it was nugentii.

    When Petite Plaisance close their doors I got a number of immature plants that were labeled D teretifolium. I assumed they were from a flask. That was 7 years ago. Now they are large plants and many have developed very different foliage from others. One has bloomed out to be Den fairfaxii with the standard zig-zag foliage. Others have very stubby foliage with out the cascading effect. Another one has terete foliage that all eminates from the same central point. I'm waiting for them to finally bloom so I can see what I have.
     
  15. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I'm glad there are enough differences between nugentii and linguiforme for Ron to so quickly tell the difference.

    Marni, it sounds like you have quite a treasure trove and challenge with those Petite Plaisance plants.
    Do you give any of these a dry winter rest?
     
  16. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Not this last winter. Things are more orderly this winter so I will try to get them separated. Den fairfaxii, teretifolium and schoeninum bloom for me without a dry rest. I do stop watering when the buds start showing to prolong the bloom.
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2015