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Dendrochilum wenzelii

Discussion in 'Orchid Species' started by KellyW, Feb 9, 2015.

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  1. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I posted this plant 2 years ago. The plant hasn't grown as much as I think it should have in 2 years. It is in a basket with coconut fiber and needs to be repotted. I would like to hear from others how you have it potted/mounted/basketed and with what medium. Also your flowering success with your method of growing. Mine didn't bloom last year. Thanks.

    Dendrochillum wenzellii plant2-900.jpg Dendrochillum wenzellii plant3-900.jpg Dendrochillum wenzellii-900.jpg
     
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  2. Tom-DE

    Tom-DE Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    It probably doesn't need to be repotted. It grows the best when it is root-bounded.

    Some years mine will bloom with over a hundred of spikes but some years just a few spikes. I don't know why either. Anyone else have the same experiences with this species?
     
  3. Boytjie

    Boytjie Out hiking Supporting Member

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    I'd say definitely don't repot it. The old cultural advice about Dendrochilum species sulking after you mess with their roots is completely true, in my experience. My best blooming Dendrochilum, a magnum (or macranthum, if you prefer), is nearly two feet tall with two dozen growths crammed into and overflowing a 6" pot. It hasn't ever been repotted, and I'm not gonna touch it until it breaks the pot. -Stephen
     
  4. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    You don't say what size pot it is in and is it filling what it is in now? I grow mine in either a fine bark mix or in a light terrestrial mix in a relatively small pot. I found they did very poorly in coconut chunks but some coir in the terrestrial mix really helps. I don't think repotting is necessarily a problem. I wait until they are filling the pot and move them up to a pot just a bit larger. If you start out with too large a pot I think that could slow things down. I let mine approach dryness before watering again and adjust the pot size/medium so that fits the watering cycle.
     
  5. Tom-DE

    Tom-DE Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Also, it is impossible to take out the old medium because the roots are so fine and tons of them that just wrap around...., so just let it grow out the pot then dump the root ball to a slightly bigger pot when you "repot" it.

    Marni, how does yours bloom for you? Mine blooms heavily one year but next year it barely has any flowers.
     
  6. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the great advice. Sounds like I should leave it alone. Is this species ever seen mounted?

    Marni, it is growing in a 4 inch plastic basket and still has room to grow. I was primarily concerned that the coco fiber was breaking down but sounds like i should leave it alone as long as it is still airy.
     
  7. Tom-DE

    Tom-DE Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Most of orchids can be grown mounted if the condition is met, and water them accordingly. This species is an epiphyte and I don't see why you can't grow it mounted. Matter of fact, I am planning on mounting a piece of mine in spring when I downsize my plant.
     
  8. Boytjie

    Boytjie Out hiking Supporting Member

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    I have a friend who mounts his Dendrochilum species horizontally, rather than vertically. His reasoning is that when he visited the Philippines, he says the vast majority of the Dendrochilums he saw were growing on the top side of horizontal tree branches. Not sure how accurate that is, but the result is really beautiful.
     
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  9. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Tom, the last few years I have been growing many of the dendrochilums in the cold house for lack of space and many of them didn't like it. Before that I got very good bloomings regularly and some years really spectacular. They are now in more appropriate conditions so we'll see.

    Kelly, if it hasn't been growing and blooming well for 2 years, more time may not be the solution.
     
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  10. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Thanks, y'all for the good suggestions.
     
  11. hbozeman

    hbozeman New Member

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    I've got one on the doorstep right now. Can't wait to get home to check it out...
     
  12. KellyW

    KellyW Orchid wonk Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I guess my concerns were unfounded. I took the advice from last year and left it alone. It has grown very well this past year and is giving me a good blooming.

    Dendrochilum wenzelii plant3-900.jpg
     
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  13. wpinnix

    wpinnix William Pinnix

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    Patience, that's the key