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Cypripedium reginae

Discussion in 'Orchid Culture' started by goods, Oct 17, 2010.

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  1. goods

    goods Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    I have been thinking about trying one of these North American natives for some time. All of them I've seen have been very expensive, though, and I have been afraid to spend the money if I won't be able to keep it alive.

    I realize it is hard to provide the proper temperatures for these when you live in South Louisiana. I have an air-conditioned room though where the low temperatures would be in the lower 60s F and the highest temperature in summer would be 80 F. The plant would sit in a window receiving SW exposure.

    Do you think I could grow this plant in a pot under these conditions?

    Thanks
     
  2. tenman

    tenman Well-Known Member

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    No, I'm afraid I don't but then I don't live in LA. They have to have winter to vernalize, so you would have to put them in a refrigerator at appropriate temps for three months or more for 'winter'. Also, I don't know if it'd be possible to grow them with the 'ground' (i.e., medium in the pot) being that warm during the growing season, either. You might want to check with some of the major suppliers; it's possible they will know or know if someone's tried this before. As for the light, it'd be iffy, but they don't have to have full sun, so maybe.
     
  3. goods

    goods Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Thanks tenman. Those were my concerns also, so I was wondering if someone from a warmer climate had any experiences with these plants being grown indoors. I think there are small populations of one species (maybe kentuckiense) growing in the northern portion of the state. I think I may wait a while before I attempt to try this though.
     
  4. samarak

    samarak Steve

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    I'll start by saying that I don't have any personal experience growing Cypripedium in pots, but I know someone in Kansas City, MO (USA) who grows a number of cyps (& other hardy terrestrials such as Calopogon) very successfully in plastic trays which he overwinters in his garage - it's unheated, but stays quite a bit warmer than the outdoors. Again I'm not an expert, but Cyp. reginae seems to be more common in northern, colder, climates so I would probably start with something that grows naturally closer to your area. (One of the Louisiana societies has/had a project in conjunction with the US Forest Service to grow Cyp. kentuckiense from seeds from plants in the Kisatchie National Forest, which I think is about halfway down the state, so maybe there is at least one species that grows not too far from you?)
     
  5. goods

    goods Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Hi samarak thank you for your response. I thought to use Cyp. reginae only because Cyp. kentuckiense is no longer available this season from the source I was planning to use. I too have heard of the project in Kisatchie National Forest. I think I also read somewhere that this population is more warmth tolerant than typical Cyp. kentuckiense from northern areas.
     
  6. Binky

    Binky Fries anyone?

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    I think you could probably get these to grow. A few people do these in pots and they winter them in the refrigerator. Check the Orchids Limited website. They have directions for making a little bog to plant them in and if you send them a note Jerry may be able to give you some more info. I would think that if it got too warm in the spring(blooming time), you could pack some ice around the pot. Just keep in mind that these are natural to Northern Minnesota. We get real winter up there and not all that warm in summer.