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Brassavola cucullata

Discussion in 'Orchid Species' started by Uluwehi, Jul 23, 2011.

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  1. Uluwehi

    Uluwehi angraecoids, dendrobiums and more Supporting Member

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    "Honorary angraecoid" ;)

    I was delighted to see this seedling plant bloom for the first time. Until recently, I had only seen this species in books; trust me when I say that pictures are no substitute for the real thing. I think the lip alone is exquisite, but I find the elongated pedicellate ovary quite remarkable in both its length and shape. At night it has a pleasant fragrance that is fresh and clean.

    I have been growing this plant warm, very humid with brisk air movement and very bright (5000fc, just 1-5cm from the 400w metal halide lamp). The average day temperature ranges from 29-32°C/84-90°F and the average night temperature is 17-21°C/64-70°F.

    Brassavola cucullata's native habitat has a remarkably broad distribution: Mexico, Belize, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Dominica, the Leeward Islands, the Windward Islands, Venezuelan Antilles, Trindad-Tobago, French Guiana, Guyana, Suriname, Venezuela and Colombia.
    5966416286_36ce805498_z.jpg 5966414972_e1da8fe4bb_z.jpg
     
    Kipper likes this.
  2. Alexis

    Alexis New Member

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    Nice, Jacob. I think I'm going to have to add this to my collection. As you would imagine, Brassavolas grow well in my conditions.

    I just have to say, you are a spectacular writer. I know language is your "thing," but every post you make is so well written. It makes me feel bad for being such a lazy communicator. I'll get over it, tho. ;-)
     
  3. Zack

    Zack Will work for plants Supporting Member

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    One of my favorite non-pleurothallids :)
     
  4. goods

    goods Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Jacob, I wish I could make a copy of your entire collection and ship it to Louisiana! I think all aspects of this species are interesting, and yours even has the reddish brown sepals and petals.

    Very nice and great growing!
     
  5. orchidkarma

    orchidkarma Member

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    Oh it is wonderful!! I think I need one of those too. Very nice shape, and the "fringe" mmmm... nice! :)
     
  6. mrbreeze

    mrbreeze Anglican Supporting Member

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    I really like this genus as well. I've had nodosa for eons and if and when i get more space I would add some more species.

    I also like your writing. But i'm more impressed with your skill at using symbols (like the little degree circle for temperatures), italics, underlines, etc. I just don't have the patience. :eek:
     
  7. nikv

    nikv Member

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    I have a lot of favorites, but I think this species is truly my topmost favorite orchid. Everyone should have at least one in their collection!
     
  8. dr_dmd

    dr_dmd The dr's out... in the greenhouse!

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    Quite stunning, Jacob! Well done.
     
  9. Uluwehi

    Uluwehi angraecoids, dendrobiums and more Supporting Member

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    Thank you all for your very nice comments. :D It's nice to be appreciated.

    Zach, I believe this has the reddish floral tones only because it is grown so bright.
     
  10. goods

    goods Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Jacob, I knew plants could turn red/purple on the leaves and stems because of high light, but I didn't know it had the same effect on flowers.
     
  11. Uluwehi

    Uluwehi angraecoids, dendrobiums and more Supporting Member

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    Zach, it may have been temperature that caused the colouration. I thought that someone had written on OI that with cucullata it was due to light levels, but now I can't seem to find who wrote that or where it was written.
     
  12. Reyna

    Reyna Orchid Obsessed Supporting Member

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    Jacob that is a beauty! I love the cucullatas -- they are lovely, easy to grow and have a great name. (Sounds like some sort of crazy bird to me.) And it may be that your plant just has reddish tints. I have one that is entirely yellow and another that has a definite red/orange halo around each of the petals and sepals.
     
  13. goods

    goods Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Jacob, I'll research a little and see if I can dig anything up about the coloration of the flowers. I always thought it was just a characteristic of certain plants similar to the purple spots on the lip of some nodosas.
     
  14. Alexey

    Alexey Well-Known Member Supporting Member

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    Jacob and Zach, your discussion about relation between flower’s color presentation and environmental factors is very interesting because this case is “non-classical”.
    Classical example 1: some of the red pigments are temperature-sensitive, resulting in more prominent red coloration of Phragmipedium besseae or Masdevallia coccinea cultivated at the lowest temperatures. Classical example 2: pigments are light-sensitive, resulting in more vibrant presentation of dark colored Paphiopedilum if plant was cultivated at the lowest light during spike formation.
    However, many of the growers have observations contradicting to these examples. I have seen darker flower coloration on phalaenopsis-type Dendrobiums, developed under higher light intensity. If someone with background in this field could provide explanation to the phenomena, it will be great.