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Ansellia africana

Discussion in 'Orchid Species' started by sam1147, Jan 2, 2015.

  1. sam1147

    sam1147 sam1147

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    1st bloom of this darker form of Ansellia.Grows outside. ansaf12142.JPG ansaf12311.JPG ansaf12143.JPG ansaf12141.JPG ansaf12312.JPG
     
    Mikhail kujawa and Kipper like this.
  2. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Nice to be where you can grow it outside. And thanks for putting your location so we know where you are.:)
     
  3. orchidnut57

    orchidnut57 Member

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    One of my favorite orchids. Beautiful. I recently received a division a while back. And to my surprise it produced 2 spikes. A lovely cluster of flowers. Thanks for sharing with us your gorgeous orchid.:clap:
     
  4. Plantman

    Plantman Member

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    Very nice plant you have and very nice flowers!

    When I first saw this Orchid in an Orchid Show it was love at first sight about 40 years ago. Bought a small seeding and prayed I could see it one day in flower! The first plant took almost 5 years to flower but even before it first bloomed managed to get 2 other plants, one at a show and another from Hauserman's in Chicago to grow in my south facing windows in New York City. I grew them in a window in Manhattan in Orchid Clay pots and used osmunda fiber. In less then 8 years 3 of the 7 different clones occupied the entire window! Not a plant for everyone, not all can give it the space it deserves but a wonderful addition if space is not a problem.

    Before they took over the windows I had to move then into a greenhouse, where they doubled in size in 6 months. Then after many of the plants were in my collection for 10 years my dad retire and he decided to move back to Puerto Rico and I thought that that would be their new home.

    So 25 years ago when I could no longer contain the plants I decided to took them to my Grandfather's farm near the Rainforest , El Yunque in Puerto Rico. They grew and grew and grew for almost 8 years before the first of the 3 Hurricanes that hit the island in the last 10 years. I had managed to expand the collection to 20 plants, some duplicates divisions of the 8 different clone I managed to acquire. Lost 15 of them totally, did find a few canes that I propped but another hurricane struck the following year and never saw any of them again.

    Many of them were awarded divisions & meristems gotten years ago from other growers at shows, one the largest grower was the first plant I ever mailed ordered in 1973, am AM from Hauserman's in Chicago and others from Beall's in Vashon Island near Seattle area 30 years.

    Some grew to be larger then me and double my withe in size. I planted them on strong branches that were forked and cut them to increase branches to support the weight, planted 15-25 feet above the ground on a 60 foot tall Breadfruit tree and would prune the branches above the plants to make sure they received the right amount of light. They were all not that huge, some were half that size and some were even smaller, in reality 2 of them were what I would call miniature forms of the species, a very red form and a very large flowering, highly marked Leopard form. At the time some were labeled Ansellia Africana and the others ver Ansellia nicolata. I had some that were more red then Brown and some faintly dotted and 2 different yellow clones, one darker and one pale yellow form.

    Living in Puerto Rico the last 4 years helping to take care of my mom who suffers with Alzheimers' I recently managed to replace 2 forms a spotted short growing form and a yellow clone labeled "Garden Party", both about a year from flowering.

    Never loved the fragrance of the flowers but loved the presentation of the plants with it's gorgeous flowers. A well grown plant will flower with branches and as the years go by and the plant gets bigger older canes will bloom along the sides. If the canes broke and you laid then on their side they would often Keiki and in 3-5 years would get a blooming sized plant.

    Here in Puerto Rico it grow in a warm tropical environment, They plants get watered in the growing season at least once or more if we get lots of showers and from Jan to March is the dry season, I may water once a week if we didn't get a few brief showers. When I grew it on my window sills in NY I grew intermediate and it grew very well but they did TRIPLE in size when i took them to Puerto Rico! I would love to get more, here they sell The Yellow form and plan on mail ordering this spring, really want to grow them again now that I a retired and have the space hope to renew the collection I once had! Anyone that would like to trade me and has a plant let me know, I can always exchange with something you's like.
     
    DPfarr and DarleneJay like this.
  5. sam1147

    sam1147 sam1147

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    Very interesting.
    Sorry I can not ship to PR.
     
  6. Fredmax

    Fredmax New Member

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    That is a very nice story, I wish I had Puerto Rican conditions or even an NY windowsill as would love to grow this well. Here in SA sadly I struggle to keep them alive. 3 seedlings have not survived now a full size plant with 6 canes is rapidly yellowing leaves and mimicking what Phalanthe dendrobiums do for me (die).
     
  7. sam1147

    sam1147 sam1147

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    As stated, adequate conditions are mostly important.This one was divided to 5 plants 3 years ago,now it is growing 20200609_102632.jpg under shade...
     
  8. Fredmax

    Fredmax New Member

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    Wow conditions look to be optimal for that division, I was very worried about cold temps despite hearing they can tolerate down to 45f/7c, I've noticed now that the leaf yellowing occurs after I give it high (winter) sun, which is in 20% humidity.
    I keep hearing how it should be as much sun as possible.

    I'm know thinking the higher humidity is more important than higher temperatures and will need to move it back into a cool greenhouse for Winter.
    What level of humidity are you able to provide for it?
     
  9. sam1147

    sam1147 sam1147

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    Whatever it is outside ;)
     
  10. Roberta

    Roberta Active Member

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    Mine get a lot colder than that... I do grow them with a little shading (although in winter shade happens anyway because of the orientation of my yard so they are probably shadier than would be ideal) While humidity is usually reasonable (like over 40% in the middle of the day) sometimes, especially in winter but also at other times - like last week - it can get both hot and dry (8%-12% RH) and my A. africana don't seem to care.
     
  11. Fredmax

    Fredmax New Member

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    Thanks for the tips, I think mine has settled down since I stopped putting it in very sunny spots, I think it was the humidity change coming from a tropical climate to mine. When the sun was out the rh would drop significantly and would notice yellowing, now that it's been in the shade it seems to be stabilizing and hopefully should be on the way to acclimatizing to handle my climate. I hope this helps anyone else trying to grow in less tropical conditions, and thanks Roberta for demonstrating to me that it's possible.