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Anguloa (virginalis) culture - light?

Discussion in 'Orchid Culture' started by D Cal, Feb 26, 2022.

  1. D Cal

    D Cal Marin County California Outdoor (mostly) grower

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    Hello,

    I've acquired an Anguloa virginalis and am researching how to grow it.

    Cool-cold, no dry rest, in nature a terrestrial - all good.

    But! lol -

    Here is what AOS says about the genus:
    "Almost direct sun in summer and as much sun as you can give it in winter, remembering that they need cooler temperatures."

    Here's what the Baker culture sheet says about virginalis, specifically:
    "LIGHT: 1500-2500 fc. Light should be somewhat filtered or diffused, and
    plants should not be exposed to direct midday sun. Strong air movement
    should be provided at all times."

    1500-2500 fc is a big range.

    Thoughts?
     
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  2. Marni

    Marni Well-Known Member Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I've never grown it, so don't have any personal experience. Some plants will grow in a range of conditions so the light range might be true. If in doubt I would start on the low end and if it doesn't burn, increase it a bit. I have seen it in greenhouses and I don't remember it being particularly bright. ISOPE gives elevation as 1250 to 2400 meters. So some experience warm/intermediate conditions. Hopefully someone with experience will chime in.
     
  3. J E

    J E Jaime Escobedo

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    Not sure but if it's like other lycastes try cool temps with medium-bright diffused light and go from there.
     
  4. Roberta

    Roberta Active Member

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    I do wonder about that AOS advice for Anguloas... I don't grow that particular species but the ones I do grow, live with the Lycastes, bright shade. Direct sun??? Maybe in Maine... Where I live, even the Cymbidiums and L. anceps benefit from light (40%) shade cloth especially in summer. Direct sun with no shading is OK for roses and cactus. I can't imagine giving that much sun to a thin-leaved orchid like Anguloa.
     
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  5. rico

    rico Active Member

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    I've had an A. virginalis for about 3 years now and I've always grown mine on the low side of "bright". I've never given it direct sun on purpose; I think I've burned it a few times but I'm not sure - the leaves that would've suffered don't exist anymore. To be fair though my plant is also a rather skimpy bloomer so maybe more light would do it good. Unfortunately I don't have any real data to share. Also, I've always had it growing int.-warm and I water it a little less in winter, but no drastic changes.
     
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  6. D Cal

    D Cal Marin County California Outdoor (mostly) grower

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    Unfortunately cultural conditions may or may not even matter at this point. I've had a disappointing experience with a South American vendor who was at Pacific Orchid Exposition in San Francisco in February (not one of the better known ones). This plant's leaves starting turning yellow and then brown, mostly along the center vein and starting at the leaf tip and progressing very rapidly to the base of the leaf, and then the leaves have all fallen off. This condition was present at pickup and advanced rapidly (despite treatment with a copper anti-fungal/bacterial). I'm left with a plant with 3 pseudobulbs and that's it, though at least those PBs aren't soft and squishy so maybe it can regenerate with some TLC. Though I'm not holding my breath.

    (p.s. 4/5 plants, and not particularly inexpensive ones, from this vendor were/are compromised/diseased, to a degree beyond normal int'l travel and shipping stress. I think I'm cured of ordering plants from So. American vendors.)
     
  7. rico

    rico Active Member

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    I'm sorry to hear about your other plants, but as long as the pseudobulbs remain turgid and green I wouldn't worry about the Anguloa too much. I haven't seen your plant of course, but turning yellow and brown fast sounds just like how my plant loses its leaves naturally. In fact, mine did that a month or so ago as it was coming into bloom; now I have a new growth maturing. I've found it to be a tough plant, so don't give up hope; it may have just been a little stressed during the trip.